The IMPACT of GHG on the entire CPG Supply Chain

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When talking about the impacts of climate change, few risks are more visceral or tangible than those it poses to future food supply. From spikes in food prices to threats to the coffee industry, consumers are increasingly aware of the effects of rising global average temperatures.

For companies in the food, beverage and tobacco sectors, climate change presents a two-fold challenge: the industry is highly exposed to climate-related impacts, but is at the same time a major contributor to increasing global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions levels – particularly from agricultural production, which according to the IPCC causes 10-14% of global GHG emissions. Continue reading “The IMPACT of GHG on the entire CPG Supply Chain”

What You Gonna Eat & Drink Tomorrow | 11th International Label Conference 2016

CONFERENCE TOPIC: BETTER WORLD

What you gonna eat & drink tomorrow?

Today we think about how we can optimize processes. How can we produce more and more favorable. We assume that everything remains as it is. Will be even better and more profitable. Our concern are the CO2 emissions. But only because the scientists tell us. The individual does not even notice that.

But what will happen if suddenly no longer there are products for packaging, to sell, to eat and drink?

Yes, that may well happen soon. Without that we perceive something – unexpected. The water is coming to an end. Surrounded by oceans, it may be that we die of thirst and hunger. Did you know that?

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Systems at risk are production systems where the land and water resources supporting agricultural production are constrained to a point where their capacity to meet current and future needs is seriously jeopardized. Constraints may be further exacerbated by unsustainable agricultural practices, social and economic pressures and the impact of climate change.

Land and water resources are central to agriculture and rural development, and are intrinsically linked to global challenges of food insecurity and poverty, climate change adaptation and mitigation, as well as degradation and depletion of natural resources that affect the livelihoods of millions of rural people across the world. Current projections indicate that world population will increase from 6.9 billion people today to 9.1 billion in 2050. In addition, economic progress, notably in the emerging countries, translates into increased demand for food and diversified diets. World food demand will surge as a result, and it is projected that food production will increase by 70 percent in the world and by 100 percent in the developing countries. Yet both land and water resources, the basis of our food production, are finite and already under heavy stress, and future agricultural production will need to be more productive and more sustainable at the same time.

Today almost 1 billion people are undernourished, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa (239 million) and Asia (578 million). In developing countries, even if agricultural production doubles by 2050, one person in twenty still risks being undernourished – equivalent to 370 million hungry people, most of whom will again be in Africa and Asia. Such growth would imply agriculture remaining an engine of growth, vital to economic development, environmental services and central to rural poverty reduction.

Deeper structural problems have also become apparent in the natural resource base. Water scarcity is growing. Salinization and pollution of water courses and bodies, and degradation of water-related ecosystems are rising. In many large rivers, only 5 percent of former water volumes remain in-stream, and some rivers such as the Huang He no longer reach the sea year-round. Large lakes and inland seas have shrunk, and half the wetlands of Europe and North America no longer exist. Runoff from eroding soils is filling reservoirs, reducing hydropower and water supply. Groundwater is being pumped intensively overpumped and aquifers are becoming increasingly polluted and salinized in some coastal areas. Large parts of all continents are experiencing high rates of ecosystem impairment, particularly reduced soil quality, biodiversity loss, and harm to amenity and cultural heritage values.

Agriculture is now a major contributor to greenhouse gases, accounting for 13.5 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions (IPCC, 2007). At the same time, climate change brings an increase in risk and unpredictability for farmers – from warming and related aridity, from shifts in rainfall patterns, and from the growing incidence of extreme weather events.

Groundwater abstraction has provided an invaluable source of ready irrigation water, but has proved almost impossible to regulate.

As a result, locally intensive groundwater withdrawals are exceeding rates of natural replenishment in key cereal-producing locations – in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Because of the dependence of many key food production areas on groundwater, declining aquifer levels and continued abstraction of non-renewable groundwater present a growing risk to local and global food production.

JOIN US at the 11th International Label Conference 2016 and build awareness of the status of land and water resources, and inform on related opportunities and challenges for the Consumer Packaged Goods Industry starting from raw material supplier up to retailer.

 

Sources: FAO 2011 & own editorial staff

Better World | How water will challenge even the Consumer Packaged Goods Industry and the entire Supply Chain | Example: India | 11th International Label Conference

Water should be high on the agenda of corporates because the future of businesses depends on the sustainability of water resources, which are increasingly under pressure. Clear implications of a water-constrained world include loss of license to operate, increased production costs, tainted brand image and adverse impact on the health of employees and the communities of operations. Despite clear signs of a pending global crisis, only a few large corporates have made addressing the challenge a high priority.

The water challenge in India is fundamentally related to agriculture. Lately however, the interdependence of water and industrial use has been emerging as a critical issue, as awareness of the diverse ways in which water use can pose substantial threats to businesses in certain regions and sectors grow. In many developing countries and emerging markets, providing a sufficient supply of drinking water or ensuring working waste water systems is a daunting challenge.

Even as businesses seek to secure long-term prosperity, to maintain competitive advantage and brand differentiation, and to secure stability and choice in supply chains, depending on the type of business there will be different levels and types of risks related to increasing scarcity of water (WWF, 2009).

While the provision and management of water has typically been a responsibility of the Government, a paradigm shift around water has emerged, which focuses on the concept of corporate water risk. The CEO Water Mandate which was launched in July 2007 under the United Nations Global Compact recognizes that the industrial sector impacts water resources both directly and through supply chains; and that in order to operate in a more sustainable manner the organization has a responsibility to make water-resource management a priority.

The central question then is no longer who is threatened by water scarcity, but given the diverse interests how can industry and agriculture adapt for co-evolution through investments in water, food or economic transfers, and water storages, considering a hierarchy of geopolitical units, river basins and institutions.

Water should be high on the agenda of corporates because the future of businesses depends on the sustainability of water resources, which are increasingly under pressure. Clear implications of a water-constrained world include loss of license to operate, increased production costs, tainted brand image and adverse impact on the health of employees and the communities of operations. Despite clear signs of a pending global crisis, only a few large corporates have made addressing the challenge a high priority.

The 11th International Label Conference will deal with this issue under one of the key topics:

BETTER WORLD

JOIN US an REGISTER NOW

Better World | Das Unbehagen an Wachstum | 11. Internationale Etikettenkonferenz

Auf einem begrenzten Planeten kann es kein unbegrenztes Wachstum geben, von dieser Einsicht geht die Postwachstumsbewegung aus. Die Frage lautet nicht, ob wir uns vom Wachstum verabschieden wollen, sondern wie der Abschied vonstattengehen soll: geplant oder erzwungen, »by design« oder »by desaster«. Ein grundlegender Wandel von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft ist gefragt.

Die globale Wirtschafts- und Finanzkrise hat die allgemeine Wachstums euphorie kaum erschüttert. Und nicht nur das, die Steigerung des Wirtschafts wachstums gilt in der Krise sogar noch als Patentrezept für deren Lösung. Von Arbeitslosigkeit und Armut über die Verschuldung von Staaten und Privathaushalten bis hin zur Arbeitsteilung zwischen Männern und Frauen sowie der Entwicklung neuer Technologien: Ohne Wachstum lassen sich angeblich keine gesellschaftlichen Fortschritte erzielen. In der Wachstumsfrage herrscht eine erstaunlich große Einigkeit, wie auch bei Wahlen regelmäßig deutlich wird. Während die CDU etwa zur Europawahl 2014 mit »Wachstum braucht Weitblick. Und einen stabilen Euro« warb, plädierte die SPD für »Ein Europa des Wachstums. Nicht des Stillstands«.

Ohne Wachstum herrscht Stillstand – eine Horrorvision, die nicht nur die Sozialdemokratie umtreibt. Das Festhalten breiter Mehrheiten am Wachstum ist durchaus verständlich. Immerhin scheinen wesentliche Einrichtungen unserer Gesellschaft, etwa der Wohlfahrtsstaat mit seinen sozialen Sicherungssystemen, nur unter der Voraussetzung einer wachsenden Wirtschaft zu funktionieren. Staatliche Umverteilung und Sozialpolitik hängen am Tropf des Wachstums, für das auch ein Großteil der Bevölkerung seit langem aus guten Gründen ein Eigen-interesse entwickelt hat. Spätestens die desaströse Lage in Griechenland, dessen Wirtschaftsleistung nach der Krise 2009 um mehr als ein Viertel schrumpfte, hat der Welt vorgeführt, was es heißt, wenn die negative Utopie einer Wachstumsgesellschaft, die nicht mehr wächst, Wirklichkeit wird. Wo alles auf Wachstum ausgelegt ist – sprich: im Kapitalismus mit seinen Verwertungs- und Profitzwängen –, führt ein rückläufiges oder ganz ausbleibendes Wachstum unausweichlich zu ökonomischen Krisen und sozialen Konflikten.

Einerseits. Andererseits wird jedoch zunehmend offensichtlich: Ein bloßes »Weiter so« auf dem Weg des Wachstums wird es nicht mehr lange geben können. Die gesellschaftliche und politische Fixierung auf immer neue Zuwachsraten blockiert mitunter die Erkenntnis, dass 2 Prozent BIP-Wachstum im Jahr 2015 eben nicht das Gleiche ist wie 2 Prozent Wachstum vor einigen Jahrzehnten, als das globale BIP-Volumen noch einen Bruchteil des heutigen ausmachte. In absoluten Größen betrachtet, bestehen zwischen den gleichen prozentualen Steigerungsraten von heute und damals gewaltige Unterschiede. Nur wenn wir uns das vergegenwärtigen, können wir ermessen, welch ungeheure Mengen an Ressourcen verbraucht werden, wie viel Arbeit geleistet wird und wie viel Ausbeutung stattfindet, um den globalen Wachstumsmotor in Gang zu halten.

Die fossilen Rohstoffe gehen zur Neige; das herkömmliche Wirtschaften zerstört die Umwelt; in den frühindustrialisierten Ländern gehen die Wachstumsraten im Mittel seit Jahrzehnten zurück; und weltweit verschärfen sich die Ungleichheiten – von solchen Tatsachen aber hat sich der Kapitalismus freilich noch nie irritieren lassen.

Doch auf einem begrenzten Planeten kann es kein unbegrenztes Wachstum geben, von dieser Einsicht geht die Postwachstumsbewegung aus. Die Frage lautet nicht, ob wir uns vom Wachstum verabschieden wollen, sondern wie der Abschied vonstattengehen soll: geplant oder erzwungen, »by design« oder »by desaster«. Ein grundlegender Wandel von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft ist gefragt.

Nur wenn es gelingt, Wohlfahrt und sozialen Fortschritt von den Zwängen der Kapitalakkumulation zu entkoppeln, ist ein selbstbestimmter Verzicht auf Wachstum möglich.

Die 11. Internationale Etikettenkonferenz widmet sich diesem Thema unter dem Motto: BETTER WORLD.

 

Zell am See | Austria | 16.-18. März 2016

JOIN US AT THE 11th INTERNATIONAL LABEL CONFERENCE

 

 

Quellen: Atlas der Globalisierung | Le Monde Diplomatique 2016