World Population & Ground Water

Feeding the World

By 2050 we’ll need to feed two billion more people. How can we do that without overwhelming the planet?

illustrate of world map

How the Consumer Packaged Goods Industry is gonna handle this?

When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

Agriculture is among the greatest contributors to global warming, emitting more greenhouse gases than all our cars, trucks, trains, and airplanes combined—largely from methane released by cattle and rice farms, nitrous oxide from fertilized fields, and carbon dioxide from the cutting of rain forests to grow crops or raise livestock. Farming is the thirstiest user of our precious water supplies and a major polluter, as runoff from fertilizers and manure disrupts fragile lakes, rivers, and coastal ecosystems across the globe. Agriculture also accelerates the loss of biodiversity. As we’ve cleared areas of grassland and forest for farms, we’ve lost crucial habitat, making agriculture a major driver of wildlife extinction.

The environmental challenges posed by agriculture are huge, and they’ll only become more pressing as we try to meet the growing need for food worldwide. We’ll likely have two billion more mouths to feed by mid-century—more than nine billion people. But sheer population growth isn’t the only reason we’ll need more food. The spread of prosperity across the world, especially in China and India, is driving an increased demand for meat, eggs, and dairy, boosting pressure to grow more corn and soybeans to feed more cattle, pigs, and chickens. If these trends continue, the double whammy of population growth and richer diets will require us to roughly double the amount of crops we grow by 2050.

Ground Water Stress

Water is essential to human, plant, and animal survival. From huge cities to tiny villages, about 50% of the world’s population depends on groundwater every day.

So what’s the problem? Well, while groundwater is the most abundant source of fresh water on earth, it remains a hidden resource. We often know where to locate it, but what really keeps it “hidden” is the limited amount of data on its availability, quantity and quality. In other words: we often have insufficient real insight in the water below.

Now it’s time to uncover the mysteries behind the great resource of groundwater!

 

Visit the #HiddenResource campaign website: thehiddenresource.com

 

Further Sources: National Geographic

 

INTRODUCING: Wil Duivenvoorden | Royal HaskoningDHV

Duivenvoorden, Wil2 NEU small.jpg

Wil Duivenvoorden | Leading Professional Agri/Food |  Royal HaskoningDHV

 

Speaker at the 11Th INTERNATIONAL LABEL CONFERENCE 2016

Future of food & beverage packaging and logistics, related to “big data”, “Industry 4.0”, Cradle to Cradle ® > Effectivity instead of Efficiency

(incl. role for “smart packaging concepts”)

or

Compliance based engineering for sustainable supply chains around new plants, within context of “local for local” > how to design for multinationals within context of glocalisation (incl. “giving back”/regional developments (e.g. water security or flood resillience)

Wil Duivenvoorden is a senior specialist in mechanical engineering and refrigeration engineering, with an extensive track record in integral design projects, related to food security and food quality assurance. As a senior agri-food expert in Royal HaskoningDHV, Wil regularly leads design teams in the area of Chain Architecture  – a unique methodology for securing and implementing logistics solutions across supply chains. Wil’s expertise and solid track record in developing solutions for logistics and micro climate issues have been applied to solving numerous food related challenges as well as in modelling and designing sustainable supply chains. Wil is board member and adviser for several commissions and consortia in the food industry, refrigeration and sustainable (circular) production fields.  His views and contributions are highly sought after and have featured in a number of publications.

 

About Royal HaskoningDHV

Royal HaskoningDHV is an independent, international engineering and project management consultancy with over 130 years of experience. Our professionals deliver services in the fields of aviation, buildings, energy, industry, infrastructure, maritime, mining, transport, urban and rural planning and water. Backed by expertise and experience of nearly 7,000 colleagues across the world, we work for public and private clients in more than 130 countries.

Our offices | Royal HaskoningDHV

We focus on delivering added value for our clients while at the same time addressing the challenges that societies are facing. These include the growing world population and the consequences for towns and cities; the demand for clean drinking water, water security and water safety; pressures on traffic and transport; resource availability and demand for energy and waste issues facing industry.

Context is critical. Every project we do exists within a changing and increasingly unpredictable environment. We understand the local context and deliver appropriate local solutions.

We believe in Enhancing Society Together. Stated simply, it means that in partnership with our clients and stakeholders we aim to contribute to a better world. ‘Together’ is important because we believe meaningful solutions for the future can no longer be created without collaboration.

Our roots are in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and South Africa. In addition, we are established in Asia and the Middle East, Africa and the Americas

About Royal HaskoningDHV | Food & Beverage

The food and beverages industry is one of the most important and dynamic industrial sectors. The range of products is extensive and with a continuous demand to improve and optimise the products to the developments in the consumer market.

On top of this, the food industry is also dealing with the demands of society for sustainability, global warming / climate change and environmental liability. And of course hygiene, energy efficiency and working conditions are daily concerns to each company involved in production of Food and Beverage.

Royal HaskoningDHV is a provider of services in the food and beverage industry. We cover a wide range of the market, from wheat preservation and feed production to the production of beer or cheese.

Food safety and hygiene is essential for our clients, so our specialist’s knowledge and experience with the regulations of EHEDG, FDA, HACCP and GMP guidelines are incorporated into every project during design and construction.

In recent years Royal HaskoningDHV has worked together with almost all main players in the international food and beverage sector. This results in depth knowledge of various production processes. This know-how, combined with our expert skills, enables us to deliver tailor-made solutions every time and to be able to provide our clients with a wide range of services.

Studies of optimising production lines

  • Advice on Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)
  • Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP)
  • Studies and advice on traceability
  • Environmental and energy impact assessments
  • Feasibility, green field and master plan studies
  • Process and technology selection
  • Due diligence studies
  • Asset management
  • Project and contract management
  • Conceptual design
  • Cost estimating (investments and exploitations)
  • Basic and detail engineering
  • Requirement specification and tendering
  • Contracting
  • All HSE services
  • On site assistance, construction and commissioning services

For more information please visit: http://www.royalhaskoningdhv.com/en-gb

 

INTRODUCING: Frans EGBERTS | Vice President | FoodDrinkEurope

frans egberts 7279

Frans EGBERTS | Vice President | FoodDrinkEurope

also: Managing Director at Henri van de Bilt B.V.

Speaker at the 11Th INTERNATIONAL LABEL CONFERENCE 2016

Session 5: GLIMPSE II | Thinking out of the box

Professional Experience

 

  • 1977 – 1978 National Service
  • 1978 – 1979 U-Meat Holten
  • 1979 – 1985 Johma Salads
  • 1985 – 1985 Delicato Nordhorn
  • 1986 – 1991 Martinair Food
  • 1991 – 1996 Stegeman
  • 1996 – 2000 Hazlewood Foods
  • From 2000 till now Henri v.d Bilt

Additional

  • Vice President FoodDrinkEurope
  • Member Supply Chain Group Clitravi
  • Advisory Group VMT
  • Boardmember VNV (Dutch Meat Manufacturers’ Association)
  • Member Civil Dialogue Group Beef
  • Member ETP Leadership team
  • Boardmember “Stichting CBS”

 

ABOUT FOOD & DRINK EUROPE

 

Role and Mission

FoodDrinkEurope’s mission is to facilitate the development of an environment in which all European food and drink companies, whatever their size, can meet the needs of consumers and society, while competing effectively for sustainable growth.

FoodDrinkEurope’s contribution is based on sound scientific research, robust data management and effective communication, working within the regulatory framework to ensure that all food and drink issues are dealt with in a holistic manner. The organisation promotes its members’ interests in areas such as food safety and sciencenutrition and health, consumer trust and choice, competitiveness, and environmental sustainability.

How FoodDrinkEurope works

FoodDrinkEurope’s permanent secretariat, based in Brussels, maintains close contacts with European and international institutions and is a major partner in consultations on all issues affecting Europe’s food and drink industry.

FoodDrinkEurope coordinates the work of more than 700 experts though its Committees and Expert Groups around four themes: food and consumer policy (food safety and science, nutrition and health), environmental sustainability and competitiveness.

Through these Committees and Expert Groups, Europe’s food and drink manufacturers provide broad and in-depth expertise. They contribute to FoodDrinkEurope positions on key issues which, once approved, are communicated to European and international decision-makers with a view to shaping legislative and non-legislative developments impacting on the industry.

How FoodDrinkEurope came about

UNICE (the Union of Industrial and Employers’ Confederations of Europe) founded the CIAA (Confederation of Food and Drink Industries of the EEC) in 1982 to replace their Commission of Food and Drink Industries.

Registered as an international association under Belgian law, CIAA’s creation provided Europe’s food and drink industry with its own independent organisation. Since then, CIAA became a key stakeholder, working with European and international institutions on issues impacting on the food and drink industry.

On 23 June 2011, CIAA opened a dynamic new chapter in its history, becoming FoodDrinkEurope. With its new, immediately identifiable name and logo, FoodDrinkEurope will continue to speak for the industry, representing both the industry’s traditions and potential.

MEMBER COMPANIES

AGROKOR

AGROKOR

CARGILL

CARGILL

COCA-COLA

COCA-COLA

DANONE

DANONE

DSM

DSM

DUPONT

DUPONT

FERRERO

FERRERO

GENERAL MILLS

GENERAL MILLS

HEINZ

HEINZ

KELLOGG

KELLOGG

MARS

MARS

McCAIN

McCAIN

Mondelez International

Mondelez International

NESTLÉ

NESTLÉ

PEPSICO

PEPSICO

SÜDZUCKER

SÜDZUCKER

TATE & LYLE

TATE & LYLE

ÜLKER

ÜLKER

UNILEVER

UNILEVER

The IMPACT of GHG on the entire CPG Supply Chain

superFull shelf

When talking about the impacts of climate change, few risks are more visceral or tangible than those it poses to future food supply. From spikes in food prices to threats to the coffee industry, consumers are increasingly aware of the effects of rising global average temperatures.

For companies in the food, beverage and tobacco sectors, climate change presents a two-fold challenge: the industry is highly exposed to climate-related impacts, but is at the same time a major contributor to increasing global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions levels – particularly from agricultural production, which according to the IPCC causes 10-14% of global GHG emissions. Continue reading “The IMPACT of GHG on the entire CPG Supply Chain”

Mergers & Acquisitions in Food and Beverage

Merger

Mergers & Acquisitions in Food and Beverage

Global Consumer M&A had a strong first half to the year, with transactions valued at US$ 202.5bn topping every H1 deal value since 2008 and representing a 42.8% uptick in deal value compared to H1 2014. The increase stemmed from two domestic mega-deals, together accounting for 47.1% of total deal value: HJ Heinz’s US$ 54.5bn acquisition of Kraft within the US food sector and Cheung Kong Holdings US$40.8bn acquisition of CKH & Hutchison Whampoa within Hong Kong’s retail sector. As a result, the Consumer sub-sectors food (US$ 80.2bn) and retail (US$ 105bn) saw an increase in deal value by 129.9% and 106.9% respectively compared to H1 2014 (food worth US$ 34.9bn; retail worth US$ 50.8bn). Food deal value reached its highest H1 deal value since 2007, whilst retail reached its highest H1 deal value on Mergermarket record.

Continue reading “Mergers & Acquisitions in Food and Beverage”

What You Gonna Eat & Drink Tomorrow | 11th International Label Conference 2016

CONFERENCE TOPIC: BETTER WORLD

What you gonna eat & drink tomorrow?

Today we think about how we can optimize processes. How can we produce more and more favorable. We assume that everything remains as it is. Will be even better and more profitable. Our concern are the CO2 emissions. But only because the scientists tell us. The individual does not even notice that.

But what will happen if suddenly no longer there are products for packaging, to sell, to eat and drink?

Yes, that may well happen soon. Without that we perceive something – unexpected. The water is coming to an end. Surrounded by oceans, it may be that we die of thirst and hunger. Did you know that?

empty shelf.jpg

Systems at risk are production systems where the land and water resources supporting agricultural production are constrained to a point where their capacity to meet current and future needs is seriously jeopardized. Constraints may be further exacerbated by unsustainable agricultural practices, social and economic pressures and the impact of climate change.

Land and water resources are central to agriculture and rural development, and are intrinsically linked to global challenges of food insecurity and poverty, climate change adaptation and mitigation, as well as degradation and depletion of natural resources that affect the livelihoods of millions of rural people across the world. Current projections indicate that world population will increase from 6.9 billion people today to 9.1 billion in 2050. In addition, economic progress, notably in the emerging countries, translates into increased demand for food and diversified diets. World food demand will surge as a result, and it is projected that food production will increase by 70 percent in the world and by 100 percent in the developing countries. Yet both land and water resources, the basis of our food production, are finite and already under heavy stress, and future agricultural production will need to be more productive and more sustainable at the same time.

Today almost 1 billion people are undernourished, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa (239 million) and Asia (578 million). In developing countries, even if agricultural production doubles by 2050, one person in twenty still risks being undernourished – equivalent to 370 million hungry people, most of whom will again be in Africa and Asia. Such growth would imply agriculture remaining an engine of growth, vital to economic development, environmental services and central to rural poverty reduction.

Deeper structural problems have also become apparent in the natural resource base. Water scarcity is growing. Salinization and pollution of water courses and bodies, and degradation of water-related ecosystems are rising. In many large rivers, only 5 percent of former water volumes remain in-stream, and some rivers such as the Huang He no longer reach the sea year-round. Large lakes and inland seas have shrunk, and half the wetlands of Europe and North America no longer exist. Runoff from eroding soils is filling reservoirs, reducing hydropower and water supply. Groundwater is being pumped intensively overpumped and aquifers are becoming increasingly polluted and salinized in some coastal areas. Large parts of all continents are experiencing high rates of ecosystem impairment, particularly reduced soil quality, biodiversity loss, and harm to amenity and cultural heritage values.

Agriculture is now a major contributor to greenhouse gases, accounting for 13.5 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions (IPCC, 2007). At the same time, climate change brings an increase in risk and unpredictability for farmers – from warming and related aridity, from shifts in rainfall patterns, and from the growing incidence of extreme weather events.

Groundwater abstraction has provided an invaluable source of ready irrigation water, but has proved almost impossible to regulate.

As a result, locally intensive groundwater withdrawals are exceeding rates of natural replenishment in key cereal-producing locations – in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Because of the dependence of many key food production areas on groundwater, declining aquifer levels and continued abstraction of non-renewable groundwater present a growing risk to local and global food production.

JOIN US at the 11th International Label Conference 2016 and build awareness of the status of land and water resources, and inform on related opportunities and challenges for the Consumer Packaged Goods Industry starting from raw material supplier up to retailer.

 

Sources: FAO 2011 & own editorial staff