INTRODUCING & WELCOME: Kirsi SEPPÄLÄINEN | Stora Enso at 12th “THE CONFERENCE”

Kirsi Seppäläinen | Vice President | Strategic projects, Biomaterials Division, Stora Enso

Speaker at the 12th INTERNATIONAL LABEL CONFERENCE 2018

What a tree can do –

Innovation as enabler for circular economy

“We have used trees and pulp for paper for many centuries. However, this sustainable and renewable raw material can do much more. New technologies help us to separate the valuable fractions of the tree more efficiently and use them into applications replacing current fossil-based materials – products that are renewable, reusable and recyclable. The components of the tree: cellulose, hemi-cellulose and lignin can create applications replacing  plastics, carbon fibres, polyester, phenols – almost anything that is made from fossil-based materials today.”

Kirsi Seppäläinen

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Member of Biomaterials division management team since March 2012. Responsible strategy process, various strategic projects, marketing communications,branding and multisite certification. Prior to this position managerial responsibilities in communications, marketing and sustainability at Stora Enso, Metsä-Botnia, Uponor and Helvar Merca Group with international focus. Stora Enso Pathbuilders’ programme 2012-2013 and Pathbreakers’ programme in 2015, both programmes focusing on strategy and innovation with IMD.

About Stora Enso

Part of the bioeconomy, Stora Enso is a leading provider of renewable solutions in packaging, biomaterials, wooden constructions and paper globally. Our customers include packaging producers, brand owners, paper and board producers, publishers, retailers, print houses, converters, and joinery and construction companies.  Stora Enso has some 26 000 employees in over 30 countries. Our sales in 2017 were EUR 10 billion, with an operational EBIT of EUR 1 billion.

We believe that everything that is made from fossil-based materials today can be made from a tree tomorrow. Our materials are renewable, reusable and recyclable, and form the building blocks for a range of innovative solutions that can help replace products based on fossil fuels and other non-renewable materials.  Biomaterials division offers a wide variety of pulp grades to meet the demands of paper, board, tissue, textile and hygiene product producers. We also develop new ways to maximise the value extractable from the wood as well as other kinds of lignocellulosic biomasses. The extracted sugars and lignin hold potential for use in a range of applications.

 

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For more information please visit: www.storaenso.com

World Population & Ground Water

Feeding the World

By 2050 we’ll need to feed two billion more people. How can we do that without overwhelming the planet?

illustrate of world map

How the Consumer Packaged Goods Industry is gonna handle this?

When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

Agriculture is among the greatest contributors to global warming, emitting more greenhouse gases than all our cars, trucks, trains, and airplanes combined—largely from methane released by cattle and rice farms, nitrous oxide from fertilized fields, and carbon dioxide from the cutting of rain forests to grow crops or raise livestock. Farming is the thirstiest user of our precious water supplies and a major polluter, as runoff from fertilizers and manure disrupts fragile lakes, rivers, and coastal ecosystems across the globe. Agriculture also accelerates the loss of biodiversity. As we’ve cleared areas of grassland and forest for farms, we’ve lost crucial habitat, making agriculture a major driver of wildlife extinction.

The environmental challenges posed by agriculture are huge, and they’ll only become more pressing as we try to meet the growing need for food worldwide. We’ll likely have two billion more mouths to feed by mid-century—more than nine billion people. But sheer population growth isn’t the only reason we’ll need more food. The spread of prosperity across the world, especially in China and India, is driving an increased demand for meat, eggs, and dairy, boosting pressure to grow more corn and soybeans to feed more cattle, pigs, and chickens. If these trends continue, the double whammy of population growth and richer diets will require us to roughly double the amount of crops we grow by 2050.

Ground Water Stress

Water is essential to human, plant, and animal survival. From huge cities to tiny villages, about 50% of the world’s population depends on groundwater every day.

So what’s the problem? Well, while groundwater is the most abundant source of fresh water on earth, it remains a hidden resource. We often know where to locate it, but what really keeps it “hidden” is the limited amount of data on its availability, quantity and quality. In other words: we often have insufficient real insight in the water below.

Now it’s time to uncover the mysteries behind the great resource of groundwater!

 

Visit the #HiddenResource campaign website: thehiddenresource.com

 

Further Sources: National Geographic

 

INTRODUCING & WELCOME: Kirsi SEPPÄLÄINEN | Stora Enso

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Kirsi Seppäläinen | Senior Vice President | Communications, Biomaterials division, Stora Enso

Speaker at the 11th INTERNATIONAL LABEL CONFERENCE 2016

Biomaterials

 

Born 1964, Master of Arts, Finnish citizen. Member of Biomaterials division management team since March 2012. Responsible for communications, marketing communications, multisite certification and until November 2014 also sustainability for Biomaterials division. Prior to this position managerial communications and sustainability positions at Stora Enso, Metsä-Botnia, Uponor and Helvar Merca Group with international focus. Stora Enso Pathbuilders’ programme 2012-2013 and Pathbreakers’ programme in 2015, both programmes focusing on strategy and innovation with IMD.

About Stora Enso

Stora Enso is a leading provider of renewable solutions in packaging, biomaterials, wooden constructions and paper on global markets. Our aim is to replace fossil based materials by innovating and developing new products and services based on wood and other renewable materials. We employ some 26 000 employees in more than 35 countries, and our sales in 2015 were EUR 10.0 billion. Stora Enso shares are listed on the Helsinki and Stockholm stock exchanges.

Stora Enso Biomaterials division offers a variety of pulp grades to meet the demands of paper, board, tissue, textile and hygiene producers. We also develop new ways to maximise the value extractable from wood, as well as other kinds of non-food-based biomass. Sugars and lignin hold potential for use in applications in the specialty chemical, construction, personal care and food industries. We have a global presence with operations in Brazil, Finland, Laos, Sweden, Uruguay and the USA.

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For more information please visit: http://biomaterials.storaenso.com/

Economic Implications of Water Scarcity and Shortages | The Future of Water Requires a Sustainable, Blue Path

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Without water, neither small businesses nor major global industries can function.

Not family farms or major agribusinesses. Not energy production facilities or computer manufacturers or steel companies. Similarly, poor water quality, or limited or unreliable access to water means higher costs for all businesses – and all consumers. Water scarcity means greater risks for a community’s long-term viability and a negative impact on their competitiveness. It also means that a community’s ability to grow and create jobs is at risk. Regardless of whether water has become the new oil, one thing is certain: water is ironically both taken for granted and serves as the engine of our economy. If not properly managed, water scarcity will directly affect the local ability to grow and create jobs.

Economic Implications of Water Scarcity and Shortages.

Right now, many companies already consider water resources when making decisions about where to invest or locate facilities. And they are giving preference to areas where water risks are lowest. These businesses understand what policymakers are now coming to realize: When water resources are unhealthy or unreliable, businesses cannot grow and cannot hire or sustain a workforce. Local commerce suffers, incomes decline, tax revenues fall. The effects are very real and they are felt immediately and acutely. Continue reading “Economic Implications of Water Scarcity and Shortages | The Future of Water Requires a Sustainable, Blue Path”

Introducing: Tanja DIETRICH-HÜBNER | REWE International AG

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Mag.a Tanja DIETRICH-HÜBNER | Director Sustainability | REWE International AG

Speaker at the 11TH INTERNATIONAL LABEL CONFERENCE 2016

Session 6: BETTER WORLD

 

Mag Tanja Dietrich Hübner, MAS, conducts since 2010 the sustainability of REWE International AG and i.a. responsible for the development of the sustainability strategy and environmental policy.

She is a member of various expert groups on CSR and sustainability, among others she is directing the trade association department for “Environment and Sustainability”.

Tanja Dietrich Hübner studied law at Vienna University and also graduated from a master’s program for Communication and PR at the University of Vienna.

 

REWE International AG

Sucessful in Germany and Europe for 88 Years

Founded 1927 in Cologne, the cooperatively set up REWE Group is one of the leading trade and tourism groups in Germany and Europe. Altogether 330.000 employees work in 12 European countries. Here you do your shopping – day by day in one of our 15.000 stores. In 2014 REWE generated a turnover of more than 51 billion euros.

For more information visit: http://www.rewe-group.com/en

The IMPACT of GHG on the entire CPG Supply Chain

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When talking about the impacts of climate change, few risks are more visceral or tangible than those it poses to future food supply. From spikes in food prices to threats to the coffee industry, consumers are increasingly aware of the effects of rising global average temperatures.

For companies in the food, beverage and tobacco sectors, climate change presents a two-fold challenge: the industry is highly exposed to climate-related impacts, but is at the same time a major contributor to increasing global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions levels – particularly from agricultural production, which according to the IPCC causes 10-14% of global GHG emissions. Continue reading “The IMPACT of GHG on the entire CPG Supply Chain”

What You Gonna Eat & Drink Tomorrow | 11th International Label Conference 2016

CONFERENCE TOPIC: BETTER WORLD

What you gonna eat & drink tomorrow?

Today we think about how we can optimize processes. How can we produce more and more favorable. We assume that everything remains as it is. Will be even better and more profitable. Our concern are the CO2 emissions. But only because the scientists tell us. The individual does not even notice that.

But what will happen if suddenly no longer there are products for packaging, to sell, to eat and drink?

Yes, that may well happen soon. Without that we perceive something – unexpected. The water is coming to an end. Surrounded by oceans, it may be that we die of thirst and hunger. Did you know that?

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Systems at risk are production systems where the land and water resources supporting agricultural production are constrained to a point where their capacity to meet current and future needs is seriously jeopardized. Constraints may be further exacerbated by unsustainable agricultural practices, social and economic pressures and the impact of climate change.

Land and water resources are central to agriculture and rural development, and are intrinsically linked to global challenges of food insecurity and poverty, climate change adaptation and mitigation, as well as degradation and depletion of natural resources that affect the livelihoods of millions of rural people across the world. Current projections indicate that world population will increase from 6.9 billion people today to 9.1 billion in 2050. In addition, economic progress, notably in the emerging countries, translates into increased demand for food and diversified diets. World food demand will surge as a result, and it is projected that food production will increase by 70 percent in the world and by 100 percent in the developing countries. Yet both land and water resources, the basis of our food production, are finite and already under heavy stress, and future agricultural production will need to be more productive and more sustainable at the same time.

Today almost 1 billion people are undernourished, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa (239 million) and Asia (578 million). In developing countries, even if agricultural production doubles by 2050, one person in twenty still risks being undernourished – equivalent to 370 million hungry people, most of whom will again be in Africa and Asia. Such growth would imply agriculture remaining an engine of growth, vital to economic development, environmental services and central to rural poverty reduction.

Deeper structural problems have also become apparent in the natural resource base. Water scarcity is growing. Salinization and pollution of water courses and bodies, and degradation of water-related ecosystems are rising. In many large rivers, only 5 percent of former water volumes remain in-stream, and some rivers such as the Huang He no longer reach the sea year-round. Large lakes and inland seas have shrunk, and half the wetlands of Europe and North America no longer exist. Runoff from eroding soils is filling reservoirs, reducing hydropower and water supply. Groundwater is being pumped intensively overpumped and aquifers are becoming increasingly polluted and salinized in some coastal areas. Large parts of all continents are experiencing high rates of ecosystem impairment, particularly reduced soil quality, biodiversity loss, and harm to amenity and cultural heritage values.

Agriculture is now a major contributor to greenhouse gases, accounting for 13.5 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions (IPCC, 2007). At the same time, climate change brings an increase in risk and unpredictability for farmers – from warming and related aridity, from shifts in rainfall patterns, and from the growing incidence of extreme weather events.

Groundwater abstraction has provided an invaluable source of ready irrigation water, but has proved almost impossible to regulate.

As a result, locally intensive groundwater withdrawals are exceeding rates of natural replenishment in key cereal-producing locations – in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Because of the dependence of many key food production areas on groundwater, declining aquifer levels and continued abstraction of non-renewable groundwater present a growing risk to local and global food production.

JOIN US at the 11th International Label Conference 2016 and build awareness of the status of land and water resources, and inform on related opportunities and challenges for the Consumer Packaged Goods Industry starting from raw material supplier up to retailer.

 

Sources: FAO 2011 & own editorial staff

Better World | How water will challenge even the Consumer Packaged Goods Industry and the entire Supply Chain | Example: India | 11th International Label Conference

Water should be high on the agenda of corporates because the future of businesses depends on the sustainability of water resources, which are increasingly under pressure. Clear implications of a water-constrained world include loss of license to operate, increased production costs, tainted brand image and adverse impact on the health of employees and the communities of operations. Despite clear signs of a pending global crisis, only a few large corporates have made addressing the challenge a high priority.

The water challenge in India is fundamentally related to agriculture. Lately however, the interdependence of water and industrial use has been emerging as a critical issue, as awareness of the diverse ways in which water use can pose substantial threats to businesses in certain regions and sectors grow. In many developing countries and emerging markets, providing a sufficient supply of drinking water or ensuring working waste water systems is a daunting challenge.

Even as businesses seek to secure long-term prosperity, to maintain competitive advantage and brand differentiation, and to secure stability and choice in supply chains, depending on the type of business there will be different levels and types of risks related to increasing scarcity of water (WWF, 2009).

While the provision and management of water has typically been a responsibility of the Government, a paradigm shift around water has emerged, which focuses on the concept of corporate water risk. The CEO Water Mandate which was launched in July 2007 under the United Nations Global Compact recognizes that the industrial sector impacts water resources both directly and through supply chains; and that in order to operate in a more sustainable manner the organization has a responsibility to make water-resource management a priority.

The central question then is no longer who is threatened by water scarcity, but given the diverse interests how can industry and agriculture adapt for co-evolution through investments in water, food or economic transfers, and water storages, considering a hierarchy of geopolitical units, river basins and institutions.

Water should be high on the agenda of corporates because the future of businesses depends on the sustainability of water resources, which are increasingly under pressure. Clear implications of a water-constrained world include loss of license to operate, increased production costs, tainted brand image and adverse impact on the health of employees and the communities of operations. Despite clear signs of a pending global crisis, only a few large corporates have made addressing the challenge a high priority.

The 11th International Label Conference will deal with this issue under one of the key topics:

BETTER WORLD

JOIN US an REGISTER NOW